Hillel Council of New England Supporting & Connecting Jewish Life Across Campuses

North Carolina Pride organizers promise ‘solution’ so Jews can attend parade set for Yom Kippur

Posted on July 17th, 2017
From JTA


Organizers of North Carolina’s gay pride parade and festival said they would find a solution following complaints from the Jewish community about the event being scheduled for Yom Kippur.

“We’re going to solve that no matter what it takes,” organizer John Short told The Herald-Sun on Thursday. “Exactly how we’ll solve that we don’t know.”

Short said the Durham Pride parade’s volunteer organizing committee had Jewish members but it still had not realized the scheduling conflict. He added that “all the Jewish community will be able to attend” the event.

“We’ll develop a solution that will be able to be carried over in the future,” Short said.

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I’m a Lesbian But The Chicago Dyke March Doesn’t Speak For Me

Posted on July 10th, 2017
BY JOANNE STRASSER EDWARDS for Kveller


It feels strange to be angry at people marching for human rights, especially when their cause is so near and dear to my wife, son and me. But last Saturday, three Jewish individuals were banned from participating in the Dyke March Chicago. Their crime? Carrying rainbow pride flags with the star of David.

When I learned that the organizers’ decision to ask them to leave was based on the participants’ apparent affiliation with the State of Israel, I felt uneasy. Because as a Zionist, gay woman, I can easily recognize good old anti-Semitism masked by the cloak of anti-Zionism. Never mind hijacking an important cause to promote a one-sided political agenda.

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Judaism and LGBTQ Issues: An Overview

Posted on July 3rd, 2017
BY BEN HARRIS for myjewishlearning.com 
Attitudes have shifted dramatically in recent decades, with sharp differences between the Orthodox and liberal movements.


As social attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people have undergone a sea change in North America, Western Europe, and Israel, official Jewish views, among the liberal denominations at least, have changed along with them.

Although as recently as 1990, the Reform movement’s rabbinic leaders officially considered heterosexual relationships “the ideal human relationship for the perpetuation of species, covenantal fulfillment, and the preservation of the Jewish people,” by the mid-1990s, the movement had fully endorsed same-sex marriage — two decades before it became legal across the United States. A decade later, the Conservative movement reversed its longstanding ban on gay sexual activity and reversed its policy of not ordaining gay and lesbian rabbis. 

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Meet The Jewish Artist Who Was The First Woman To Draw ‘Wonder Woman’

Posted on June 26th, 2017
By Jenny Singer for The Forward
 

Maybe one day they will say that behind every “great woman” there has to be countless stories of other great women who supported them. And behind the icon of great womanhood “Wonder Woman” is the legendary cartoonist Trina Robbins.

Robbins, 78, has made a career of shading in the colorful histories of unsung female heroes. She was approached to illustrate the limited series “The Legend of Wonder Woman” in 1986.

She says she imagined producers at DC reasoned: “Why don’t we just give it to Trina — we all know she loves “Wonder Woman”. Even if she screws it up, it’s just four issues.”

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These Dads Are Expecting a Baby After Miscarriage–Here’s Their Story

Posted on June 19th, 2017
BY JOANNA C. VALENTE for Kveller


All families come in different shapes and sizes and kinds–but that doesn’t mean the love is any less. For one married couple who are dads to two kids, this couldn’t be more true–and a lesson for those who think families do come “one way.” Trystan and Biff are two dads living in Portland, Oregon who adopted their two children. However, their family isn’t stopping there: Trystan is pregnant.

Trystan is transgender–and has been pregnant before, but suffered a miscarriage around six weeks. For any parent, this is devastating but for Trystan, it was especially complicated because trying to become pregnant means he couldn’t take testosterone. This was why the couple decided to try again shortly after the miscarriage–which the couple discussed on the WNYC podcast, the Longest Shortest Time.

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